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34060 Montpellier, France

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Phymea products

QPAR - measuring potential photosynthesis efficiency to optimise plant production

Optimising photosynthesis : a new asset for plant production

 

Photosynthesis is the biochemical process through which plant fix Carbon from atmospheric CO2 using energy from light. It produces plant sugars, essential for physiological processes (cellular energy, osmoregulation, etc ). Optimum plant production is therefore connected to the optimisation of plant photosynthesis, which is directly dependent on light, temperature and CO2 conditions. Those three parameters interact with each other making it difficult for growers to reason environmental conditions such as CO2 enrichment, which can be costly for growers and injurious for the environment.

 

QPAR : measuring photosynthesis with regard to environmental conditions 

 

The QPAR - Quantification of Photosyntheticaly Active Radiation measures specific wavelengths affecting plant photosynthesis efficiency, and estimates potential photosynthesis, taking into account the various effects of light, CO2 and temperature. Producers can therefore measure the effects of environmental conditions directly on plant production, and optimize them accordingly.  

 

A product that differs fom classical light measurement devices 

 

Our product difers from classical Luxmeters for two main reasons :

  • The instrument uses a PAR sensor that measures photosynthetically active wavelengths, between 400 and 750nm while Luxmeters only measure the spectrum visible for the human eye, between 500 and 680nm (see graph below).

  • The measuring device integrates a photosynthesis model developed specificaly by Phymea® systems. The model is based on scientific knowledge and laboratory measurements of the photosynthesis responses to light, temperature and CO2. This model allows the simulation of plant potential photosynthesis in optimal hydric and nutritive conditions.

 

 

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